Seven Lectures at Seven Gables

2017 Lectures

2017 Lectures will be on select dates at 6pm.

Lecture Pricing

Members FREE; non-members $7.00

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Please RSVP to:
Ryan Conary
Marketing & Reservations Coordinator
978-744-0991, ext. 104
rconary@7gables.org

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Julie Arrison-Bishop
Special Projects Manager
978-744-0991, ext. 152
jarrison@7gables.org

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Our 2017 Seven Lectures at Seven Gables Series will be themed around life and labor over four centuries at The House of the Seven Gables.  Please click on the lecture titles below for more information.

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March 2, 2017 - 6:00 pm

From the Folks Who Brought You the Weekend: A Short History of Labor in the United States

from-the-folks-who-brought-you-the-weekendJoin The House of the Seven Gables for the kickoff lecture in the Seven Lectures at Seven Gables series. A.B. Chitty and Priscilla Murolo will present their books, From the Folks Who Brought You the Weekend: A Short, Illustrated History of Labor in the United States. The book tackles the perception of “good jobs leaving the United States,” and the fact that many of these jobs weren’t good until they were union jobs. The work also looks at the connections between the American middle class and organized labor and their rise and fall together. A book signing will follow the presentation in the Museum Store.

Priscilla Murolo teaches American history at Sarah Lawrence College in Yonkers, New York. She has recently been active in support of a successful organizing drive by Operating Engineers Local 30 among maintenance staff at Sarah Lawrence.

A.B. Chitty is the Library Systems Officer at Queens College of the City University of New York in Flushing, New York. He is active around safety and health issues for his union, the Professional Staff Congress, Local 2334 of the American Federation of Teachers.

They are married (to each other), and have become grandparents.

Members: Free

Non-Members: $7.00

To reserve your spot for this lecture please CLICK HERE, or email jarrison@7gables.org, or call 978-744-0991 ext. 152.

April 12, 2017 - 6:00 pm

A World of Work: Daily Life and Labor in Seventeenth-Century Salem

Daily life in early colonial America was marked by harEmerson Bakerd labor for most. From shipwrights to fishermen to farmers, work meant survival. Everyone in the family had a job to fulfill. Join Emerson Baker, professor of history at Salem State University, to learn about life in the earliest days of colonial Salem.

Emerson "Tad" Baker is a professor of History at Salem State University.  He is the award-winning author of many works on the history of and archaeology of early Maine and New England, including A Storm of Witchcraft: The Salem Trials and the American Experience. He has served as an advisor for PBS-TV’s American Experience and Colonial House. Baker is a member of the Gallows Hill Project team who recently confirmed the witch trials execution site. He regularly tweets on the Salem witch trials and early New England history at @EmersonWBaker.

Members: Free

Non-Members: $7.00

To reserve your spot for this lecture please CLICK HERE, or email jarrison@7gables.org, or call 978-744-0991 ext. 152.

May 11, 2017 - 6:00 pm

New England Bound

Dr. Wendy Warren of Princeton University will be presenting about her book, New England Bound: Slavery and Colonization in Early America. Her work explores the experience of chattel bondage in seventeenth-century New England, illuminating the deadly symbiosis between slavery and colonization in the Atlantic World. A book signing will follow the lecture in our Museum Store.

Wendy Warren is Assistant Professor of History; Philip and Beulah Rollins Bicentennial Preceptor at Princeton University. Dr. Warren specializes in the history of colonial North America, and the early modern Atlantic World. She is particularly interested in the day-to-day practice of colonization, and in the negotiations and conflicts that exist between would-be rulers and the unruly.

Professor Warren began her work at Princeton in 2010, after receiving her M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. in history from Yale University. Her book, New England Bound: Slavery and Colonization in Early America (Liveright/W.W. Norton, 2016), explores the lived experience of chattel bondage in seventeenth-century New England, illuminating the deadly symbiosis between slavery and colonization in the Atlantic World.

Members: Free

Non-Members: $7.00

To reserve your spot for this lecture please CLICK HERE.  For more information, email groups@7gables.org, or call 978-744-0991 ext. 152.

June 7, 2017 - 6:00 pm

"Judge Ye Weather Or Noe I Hadent Ort To Be Set At Liberty": Essex County Freedom Suits in Revolutionary Massachusetts

Jeanne Pickering, a Master’s student at Salem State College, will review how slavery's gradual ending in revolutionary Massachusetts began with lawsuits for freedom filed by enslaved people in Essex County prior to the War. As Patriots agitated for their liberty from British Imperial rule, enslaved laborers argued to protect themselves and their families from the disruption of enslavement.

Jeanne Pickering is a graduate student in history at Salem State University, finishing her Masters thesis on the Essex County freedom suits. Her research interests are the social and cultural aspects of colonial slavery in rural Massachusetts concentrating on the North Shore. She regularly speaks on slavery in Essex County to local history groups and runs a website on Essex County slavery at NorthShoreSlavery.org.

Members: Free

Non-Members: $7.00

To reserve your spot for this lecture please CLICK HERE, or email jarrison@7gables.org, or call 978-744-0991 ext. 152.

 

August 2, 2017 - 6:00 pm

"This Gallant Crew:" The Builders, Sailors, Marines, and Preservationists of USS Constitution, America's Ship of State

For nearly 150 of her 220-year career, USS Constitution has called Boston her homeport.  From the building of the massive frigate in Boston’s North End, to manning the ship with sailors and Marines through “houses of rendezvous” in the city, to her repairs after battle at the Charlestown Navy Yard, the life of “Old Ironsides” has been inextricably entwined with Boston.  This illustrated presentation will review the building of Constitution, the service of U.S. Navy sailors and Marines in the War of 1812 when she battled the Royal Navy, the largest navy in the western world, and the tremendous skill and effort that it takes to preserve a national icon.

Margherita M. Desy is a curator and historian of New England maritime and early U.S. Navy histories and is employed by the Naval History & Heritage Command Detachment Boston as historian for USS Constitution.  Margherita has previously worked for Historic New England, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, the Harriet Beecher Stowe House in Hartford, and, for 20 years, at Mystic Seaport in Mystic, Connecticut.  Margherita taught for fourteen years in the Museum Studies Program in Tufts University’s Graduate and Professional Studies Department.

Ms. Desy has a BA in History & Art History from the College of the Holy Cross, an MA in American Civilization from The George Washington University, and has studied at Sotheby’s Institute in London.  She has been published in scholarly and popular journals and has been script advisor and on-camera historian for several PBS television shows and documentaries broadcast in the U.S. and Europe.

Members: Free

Non-Members: $7.00

To reserve your spot for this lecture please CLICK HERE.  For more information, please email groups@7gables.org, or call 978-744-0991 ext. 152.

September 6, 2017 - 6:00 pm

Voices From the Back Stairs: Domestic Staff in New England

Although domestic servants made everyday life in grand homes possible, their identities and roles within the household have long been hidden. This lecture will illustrate the diversity of domestic service in New England over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries by focusing on three Historic New England properties. Period domestic manuals, ephemera, and other general material will also bring the lives of servants and relationships with their employers to the foreground.

Dr. Jennifer Pustz is the former museum historian at Historic New England, where she conducted and coordinated social history research for the organization. She holds a Ph.D. in American studies from the University of Iowa and M.A. and B.A. degrees in art history. Prior to moving to New England, she was the historian at Brucemore, a National Trust Historic Site in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. She is the author of Voices from the Back Stairs: Interpreting Servants’ Lives at Historic House Museums (Northern Illinois University Press, 2010) and a contributing author of Historic New England’s America’s Kitchens publication (2009). Pustz is currently pursuing an additional degree in nutrition science from Tufts University.

Members of The Gables and Historic New England: Free

Non-Members: $7.00

To reserve your spot for this lecture please CLICK HERE. For more information please email groups@7gables.org, or call 978-744-0991 ext. 152.

November 2, 2017 - 6:00 pm

The Mother Lode

Historical novelist William Martin’s next book, The Mother Lode, is due out in the fall of 2017. This work continues his lifelong epic of American history with the further adventures of Boston rare-book dealer Peter Fallon and his girlfriend, Evangeline Carrington. This time, they are headed to California, where their search for a lost journal takes them into the history of the Gold Rush and gets them into plenty of trouble, too. The journal follows a group of young men who journey by sea from staid Boston to wild San Francisco, then travel up into the gold country, where they confront greed, racism, and themselves in an epic tale of adventure. Join the author for the final lecture in the Seven Lectures at Seven Gables and learn about his research and writing process. A book signing will follow the lecture.

William Martin is the award-winning New York Times bestselling author of ten novels, a PBS documentary, book reviews, magazine articles, and a cult-classic horror movie, too. His first Peter Fallon novel, Back Bay, established him as "a master storyteller." He has been following the lives of the great and anonymous in American history ever since and has taken readers from the Pilgrims to 9/​11. He was the 2005 recipient of the prestigious New England Book Award, given to an author "whose body of work stands as a significant contribution to the culture of the region." In 2015, the USS CONSTITUTION Museum gave him the Samuel Eliot Morison Award for "patriotic pride, artful scholarship, and an eclectic interest in the sea and things maritime." He lives near Boston with his wife and has three grown children.

Members: Free

Non-Members: $7.00

To reserve your spot for this lecture please CLICK HERE.  For more information please email groups@7gables.org, or call 978-744-0991 ext. 152.