Educational Program Standards

Make a Reservation

Reservations are necessary for all educational programs, and scheduling early is recommended, especially for spring and fall programs.  Once a program is reserved, classroom teachers receive a valuable resource packet to use prior to the visit to The House of the Seven Gables.

Please note: These programs for elementary and middle schools are not available during the month of October.

For Information, Please Contact:
Ana Nuncio
Manager of Settlement Partnerships
978-744-0991, ext. 105
anuncio@7gables.org

To Book, Please Contact:
Ryan Conary
Marketing & Reservations Coordinator
978-744-0991, ext. 104
rconary@7gables.org

Educational Program Standards

History and Social Science, Mathematics Curriculum Frameworks

Common Core State Standards

Full text of standards

Educational Program: Naumkeag Settlers to Salem Shippers

2003 Framework — History and Social Science Standards:

2.8, 3.3, 3.4, 3.8, 3.9, 3.11, 3.12, 4.15, 4.16, 4.28, 4.29, 5.9, 5.10, 5.11, 5.12, 5.31, 5.33

2.8 With the help of the school librarian, give examples of traditions or customs from other countries that can be found in America today. (G, C)

3.3 Identify who the Pilgrims were and explain why they left Europe to seek religious freedom; describe their journey and their early years in the Plymouth Colony. (H, G, C, E)

  1. the purpose of the Mayflower Compact and its principles of self-government
  2. challenges in settling in America
  3. events leading to the first Thanksgiving

3.4 Explain how the Puritans and Pilgrims differed and identify early leaders in Massachusetts, such as John Winthrop; describe the daily life, education, and work of the Puritans in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. (H, E, C)

3.8 On a map of Massachusetts, locate the class’ home town or city and its local geographic features and landmarks. (G)

3.9 Identify historic buildings, monuments, or sites in the area and explain their purpose and significance. (H, C)

3.11 Identify when the students’ own town or city was founded, and describe the different groups of people who have settled in the community since its founding. (H, G)

3.12 Explain how objects or artifacts of everyday life in the past tell us how ordinary people lived and how everyday life has changed. Draw on the services of the local historical society and local museums as needed. (H, G, E)

4.15 Describe the diverse nature of the American people by identifying the distinctive contributions to American culture of:

  1. several indigenous peoples in different areas of the country (e.g., Navajo, Seminoles, Sioux, Hawaiians, and Inuits).
  2. African Americans, including an explanation of their early concentration in the South because of slavery and the Great Migration to northern cities in the 20th century, and recent African immigrant groups (e.g., Ethiopian) and where they tended to settle in large numbers.
  3. major European immigrant groups who have come to America, locating their countries of origin and where they tended to settle in large numbers (e.g., English, Germans, Italians, Scots, Irish, Jews, Poles, and Scandinavians).
  4. major Spanish-speaking (e.g., Cubans, Mexicans) and Asian (e.g., Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese) immigrant groups who have come to America in the 19th and 20th centuries, locating their countries of origin and where they tended to settle in large numbers. (H, G)

4.16 Identify major immigrant groups that live in Massachusetts and where they now live in large numbers (e.g., English, Irish, Italians, French Canadians, Armenians, Greeks, Portuguese, Haitians, and Vietnamese). (H, G)

4.28 Describe the climate and major natural resources of Central America and the Caribbean Islands and explain their relationship to the economy of those regions. (G, E)

4.29 Identify the different languages used in different countries in the Caribbean region today (e.g., Spanish in Cuba, French in Haiti, English in Barbados and Jamaica). (H)

5.9 Explain the reasons that the language, political institutions, and political principles of what became the United States of America were largely shaped by English colonists even though other major European nations also explored the New World. (H, C)

A. the relatively small number of colonists who came from other nations besides England

B. long experience with self-government

C. the high rates of literacy and education among the English colonial leaders

D. England’s strong economic, intellectual, and military position

5.10 On a map of North America, identify the first 13 colonies and describe how regional differences in climate, types of farming, populations, and sources of labor shaped their economies and societies through the 18th century. (H, G, E)

5.11 Explain the importance of maritime commerce in the development of the economy of colonial Massachusetts, using the services of historical societies and museums as needed.

(H, E)

A. the fishing and shipbuilding industries

B. trans-Atlantic trade

C. the port cities of New Bedford, Newburyport, Gloucester, Salem, and Boston

5.12 Explain the causes of the establishment of slavery in North America. Describe the harsh conditions of the Middle Passage and slave life, and the responses of slaves to their condition. Describe the life of free African Americans in the colonies. (H, G, E, C)

5.31 Describe the significance and consequences of the abolition of slavery in the northern states after the Revolution and of the 1808 law that banned the importation of slaves into the United States. (H)

5.33 Explain the importance of the China trade and the whaling industry to 19th century New England, and give examples of imports from China. (H)

Naumkeag Settlers to Salem Shippers — Common Core State Standards

Reading Standards for Informational Text

Grade 2 CCR (College and Career Readiness) Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

7. Explain how specific images (e.g., a diagram showing how a machine [whirling toy] works) contribute to and clarify a text.

Writing Standards

Grade 2 CCR (College and Career Readiness) Research to Build and Present Knowledge

8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.

Grade 3 -5 CCR (College and Career Readiness) Research to Build and Present Knowledge

7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.

8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories.

Educational Program: The Worldwide Trading Game

2003 Framework –History and Social Sciences Standards: 4.15, 4.16, 4.28, 4.29, 5.9, 5.11, 5.12, 5.31, 5.32, 5.33

4.15 Describe the diverse nature of the American people by identifying the distinctive contributions to American culture of:

  1. several indigenous peoples in different areas of the country (e.g., Navajo, Seminoles, Sioux, Hawaiians, and Inuits).
  2. African Americans, including an explanation of their early concentration in the South because of slavery and the Great Migration to northern cities in the 20th century, and recent African immigrant groups (e.g., Ethiopian) and where they tended to settle in large numbers.
  3. major European immigrant groups who have come to America, locating their countries of origin and where they tended to settle in large numbers (e.g., English, Germans, Italians, Scots, Irish, Jews, Poles, and Scandinavians).
  4. major Spanish-speaking (e.g., Cubans, Mexicans) and Asian (e.g., Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese) immigrant groups who have come to America in the 19th and 20th centuries, locating their countries of origin and where they tended to settle in large numbers. (H, G)

4.16 Identify major immigrant groups that live in Massachusetts and where they now live in large numbers (e.g., English, Irish, Italians, French Canadians, Armenians, Greeks, Portuguese, Haitians, and Vietnamese). (H, G)

4.28 Describe the climate and major natural resources of Central America and the Caribbean Islands and explain their relationship to the economy of those regions. (G, E)

4.29 Identify the different languages used in different countries in the Caribbean region today (e.g., Spanish in Cuba, French in Haiti, English in Barbados and Jamaica). (H)

5.9 Explain the reasons that the language, political institutions, and political principles of what became the United States of America were largely shaped by English colonists even though other major European nations also explored the New World. (H, C)

A. the relatively small number of colonists who came from other nations besides England

B. long experience with self-government

C. the high rates of literacy and education among the English colonial leaders

D. England’s strong economic, intellectual, and military position

5.11 Explain the importance of maritime commerce in the development of the economy of colonial Massachusetts, using the services of historical societies and museums as needed.

(H, E)

A. the fishing and shipbuilding industries

B. trans-Atlantic trade

C. the port cities of New Bedford, Newburyport, Gloucester, Salem, and Boston

5.12 Explain the causes of the establishment of slavery in North America. Describe the harsh conditions of the Middle Passage and slave life, and the responses of slaves to their condition. Describe the life of free African Americans in the colonies. (H, G, E, C)

5.31 Describe the significance and consequences of the abolition of slavery in the northern states after the Revolution and of the 1808 law that banned the importation of slaves into the United States. (H)

5.32 Describe the causes of the war of 1812 and how events during the war contributed to a sense of American nationalism. (H)

A. British restrictions on trade and impressment

B. Major battles and events of the war, including the role of the USS Constitution, the burning of the Capitol and the White House, and the Battle of New Orleans

5.33 Explain the importance of the China trade and the whaling industry to 19th century New England, and give examples of imports from China. (H)

 

 

Download Full Text Standards

 

Make a Reservation

Reservations are necessary for all educational programs, and scheduling early is recommended, especially for spring and fall programs.  Once a program is reserved, classroom teachers receive a valuable resource packet to use prior to the visit to The House of the Seven Gables.

Please note: These programs for elementary and middle schools are not available during the month of October.

For Information, Please Contact:
Ana Nuncio
Manager of Settlement Partnerships
978-744-0991, ext. 105
anuncio@7gables.org

To Book, Please Contact:
Ryan Conary
Marketing & Reservations Coordinator
978-744-0991, ext. 104
rconary@7gables.org